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Don Meredith
December 5, 2010

Don Meredith, 72, a Texas-born
quarterback who after nine seasons with
the Dallas Cowboys became the
boot-wearing, country-crooning foil to
Howard Cosell as a color commentator on
the original cast of ABC's "Monday Night
Football," died Dec. 5 at a hospital in Santa
Fe, N.M.

His wife, Susan, said Mr. Meredith died after
a brain hemorrhage. In recent years, he
was treated for emphysema and had
suffered a stroke in 2004.

In more than 170 appearances on ABC's
prime-time Monday evening NFL telecast,
Mr. Meredith came to be known as "Dandy
Don," the fun-loving Southwestern
bumpkin who baited Cosell, the stiff and
abrasive New Yorker.
DELTA FILMS
December 2010
Steve Landesberg
December 20, 2010

Actor Steve Landesberg, a former stand-up
comedian who starred for years on the hit
television sitcom "Barney Miller," has died at
age 65, his agent said on Monday.

Born Nov. 23, 1945 in New York City,
Landesberg began his career as a stand-up
comedian and was a contemporary of top
1970s draws such as Freddie Prinze and
Jimmy Walker.

He landed the role of Det. Arthur Dietrich on
"Barney Miller" in 1975, and stayed with the
show about New York cops until it ended in
1982.

Landesberg went on to work in a variety of
TV and movie roles, including the series
"Cosby" and "The Ghost Whisperer," and the
hit 2008 movie "Forgetting Sarah Marshall."
Blake Edwards
December 15, 2010

Blake Edwards, the director and writer
known for clever dialogue, poignance and
occasional belly-laugh sight gags in
"Breakfast at Tiffany's," "10" and the
"Pink Panther" farces, is dead at age 88.

Edwards died from complications of
pneumonia at about 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday at St. John's Health Center in
Santa Monica, said publicist Gene
Schwam. Blake's wife, Julie Andrews, and
other family members were at his side.
He had been hospitalized for about two
weeks.

Edwards had knee problems, had
undergone unsuccessful procedures and
was "pretty much confined to a
wheelchair for the last year-and-a-half or
two," Schwam said.
Fred Foy
December 22, 2010

Fred Foy, the radio announcer
best-known for calling out "Hi-Yo,
Silver!" in his passionate lead-in to
"The Lone Ranger," has died at his
Massachusetts home.

His daughter, Nancy Foy, says her
father died Wednesday of natural
causes. He was 89.

Nancy Foy says her father worked as
an actor before landing the job as the
announcer on "The Lone Ranger" in
1948. Radio historian Jim Harson said
Foy's dramatic introduction, performed
over and over for the live program, was
so good it "made many people forget
there were others before him."
Neva Patterson
December 14, 2010

Neva Patterson, a character actress who
portrayed Cary Grant's fiancee in the 1957
movie "An Affair to Remember" in a career
that spanned six decades and more than
100 film and TV roles, has died. She was
90.

Patterson died Tuesday at her Brentwood
home of complications from a broken hip,
said her daughter, Megan Lee.

After making her film debut in "Taxi"
(1953), Patterson appeared in more than a
dozen movies. She played a worried mother
in the well-reviewed "David and Lisa," a
1962 film about two teens with mental
illness who fall in love. In the 1957 movie
"Desk Set" she portrayed Spencer Tracy's
prim, uptight computer expert and
assistant.
Geraldine Doyle
December26, 2010

Geraldine Doyle, inspiration for 'Rosie the
Riveter,' dies at 86.

With a red and white bandana in her hair
and factory worker uniform sleeves rolled
up to reveal her bulging biceps, Rosie the
Riveter was painted on a World War II
recruitment poster in 1942. But for four
decades, the real Rosie the Riveter had no
idea she was the woman who inspired it.

Perhaps it was because Geraldine Doyle
left her factory job after two weeks – or
because she didn’t actually have bulging
biceps – that Doyle, who died at 86 years
old on Sunday in Lansing, Mich., didn’t
know for so long that she was the model
for what would became a symbol of
women’s empowerment.
Agathe von Trapp
December 28, 2010

Agathe von Trapp, the eldest daughter of
the von Trapp family made famous in
"The Sound of Music," died of congestive
heart failure Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice
Care. She was 97 and lived in
Brooklandville, Md.

For the past five decades, after she and
her siblings stopped performing as the
Trapp Family Singers, she lived a quiet life
as "a virtual recluse" in Glyndon, Md. She
was a kindergarten teacher's helper at a
private Catholic school affiliated with the
Sacred Heart Parish for many years, said
a friend, Mary Louise Kane, with whom
she lived.

A 2003 article in The Baltimore Sun noted
that in the movie that dominated the
1965 Academy Awards and broke
box-office records, she came out of her
shell at "16 going on 17," as the song
said, but the reality of her life was
different.

"It's very strange for me; I've been living
a very quiet life. All of a sudden, these
people want to see me," she said at the
time she published her autobiography in
which she sought to set the record
straight between fact and fiction.

She wanted people to know that her
father, Capt. Georg von Trapp, a
widowed Austrian aristocrat who was
played by Christopher Plummer in the film
and Theodore Bikel on Broadway, was
not cold, unfeeling and distant. She
insisted he was a kind and loving father.
Bill Erwin
December 29, 2010


Bill Erwin, 96, a veteran character
actor remembered for his role as
Arthur the bellman in the 1980
fantasy film "Somewhere in Time"
and his Emmy-nominated guest
appearance on "Seinfeld," died
Wednesday at his home in Studio
City of age-related causes, his son
Mike said Friday.
Yvette Vickers
unknown date 2010


The Attack of the 50 Foot Woman star and
former Playboy pinup was sadly found
mummified in her home a year after her death
at age 82.

She was discovered by neighbor Susan
Savage in April 2011. The state of her body
suggested that she had been dead for close
to a year.